Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Dangerously Close

Prescribed by His Holiness Pope Leo XIII for the month of October after the recitation of the Rosary.
To thee, O blessed Joseph, do we have recourse in our tribulation, and, having implored the help of thy thrice-holy Spouse, we confidently invoke thy patronage also. By that charity wherewith thou wast united to the immaculate Virgin Mother of God, and by that fatherly affection with which thou didst embrace the Child Jesus, we beseech thee and we humbly pray, that thou wouldst look graciously upon the inheritance which Jesus Christ hath purchased by His Blood, and assist us in our needs by thy power and strength.

Most watchful guardian of the Holy Family, protect the chosen people of Jesus Christ; keep far from us, most loving father, all blight of error and corruption: mercifully assist us from Heaven, most mighty defender, in this our conflict with the powers of darkness; and, even as of old thou didst rescue the Child Jesus from the supreme peril of His life, so now defend God's Holy Church from the snares of the enemy and from all adversity; keep us one and all under thy continual protection, that we may be supported by thine example and thine assistance, may be enabled to lead a holy life, die a happy death and come at last to the possession of everlasting blessedness in Heaven. Amen.

Ad te beáte Joseph, in tribulatióne nostra confúgimus, atque, imploráto Sponsæ tuæ sanctíssimæ auxílio, patrocínium quoque tuum fidenter expóscimus. Per eam, quæsumus, quæ te cum immaculáta Vírgine Dei Genitríce coniúnxit, caritátem, perque patérnum, quo Púerum Iesum ampléxus es, amórem, súpplices deprecámur, ut ad hereditátem, quam Iesus Christus acquisívit Sánguine suo, benígnus respícias, ac necessitátibus nostris tua virtúte et ope succúrras.

Tuére, o Custos providentíssime divínæ Famíliæ, Iesu Christi sóbolem eléctam; próhibe a nobis, amantíssime Pater, omnem errórum ac corruptelárum luem; propítius nobis, sospítator noster fortíssime, in hoc cum potestáte tenebrárum certámine e cælo adésto; et sicut olim Púerum Iesum e summo eripuísti vitre discrímine, ita nunc Ecclesiam sanctam Dei ab hostílibus insídiis atque ab omni adversitáte défende: nosque síngulos perpétuo tege patrocínio, ut ad tui exémplar et ope tua suffúlti, sancte vívere, pie émori, sempiternámque in cælis beatitúdinem ássequi possímus. Amen.

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Brothers in the Fight

From The Remnant

"At the Catholic Identity Conference in Weirton, WV, this weekend priests from all the major traditional Catholic fraternities and priestly societies came together to encourage the faithful to keep the old Faith and be not discouraged. Here we have two diocesan priests (who offer the old Mass only), one priest of the Fraternity of St Peter, one priest of the Society of St Pius X, and one priest of the Institute of Christ the King. ..."

God bless our Holy Priests.


Saturday, September 5, 2015

I Left My Heart... Syracuse.

Pope Saint Pius X, pray for us!
St. John Bosco, pray for us!
St. Thomas More, pray for us!
St. John Fisher, pray for us!
Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us!
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, have mercy on us.


Monday, July 20, 2015

A Prayer for Our Times

On this feast day of St. Jerome Emilian (d. 1537), let us pray the prayer he taught to the little orphans he loved and cared for so well, a prayer most appropriate for our times:

"Lord Jesus Christ, our loving Father, we beseech Thee, by Thine infinite goodness, raise up Christendom once more, and bring it back to that upright holiness which flourished in the apostolic age."

Amen! St. Jerome Emilian, pray for us!

Sunday, July 12, 2015

From Whence Vocations, specifically ...

LaSalette Boys Academy.  

21 graduates...16 of them going to the seminary in 2015.  I don't think St. John Bosco could say much against that percentage!

Where vocations are, there the Church flourishes.

Sunday, June 21, 2015

From Whence, Vocations?

As I begin writing this blog entry, there are so many titles I could give to it. Perhaps by the end it will title itself. But for now I will choose From Whence, Vocations? from among a number of fitting possibilities including New Priest's First Mass, Blessing, and Reception, Happy Father's Day, and Congratulations, Father Flanery! 

Any of those titles would be appropriate to sum up this beautiful day. But as I sit here pondering the events of the day over in my mind, the central theme for me is certain: vocations. A quick summary of the day, then I'll follow with my thoughts on this important point.

Today we were among the faithful of Saint Mary's Assumption in Saint Louis who were privileged to assist at the First Mass of the recently ordained Reverend Father Dylan Flanery, son of Dr. and Mrs. Randy Flanery. And what a beautiful Mass it was, with three of the altar servers being brothers of Father Flanery and the cross-bearer his young nephew. 

Following Holy Mass the faithful again approached the communion rail and knelt to receive Father's first blessing, kiss his consecrated hands and receive his ordination prayer cards.

Mid-afternoon many if not all of the faithful gathered once again to celebrate Father Flanery at a lovely luncheon Reception. Such a blessed day, I can only begin to imagine how pleased and proud the Flanery family is to now have a priest among them. Deo gratias!

Which brings me back to the title of my post! During the luncheon celebration there were several speakers including our pastor Father Jackson and resident priest Father Pieroni, Father Flanery's dad, Dr. Flanery, and finally, Father Flanery himself. Each of these speakers in his turn brought warm sentiments, moments of laugh-out-loud humor, as well as thought-provoking ideas surrounding vocations.

Dr. Flanery, with equal parts wit and wisdom, told us how he believed there are three main ingredients in the formation of a vocation to the priesthood or religious life. The first two might be somewhat predictable:  first, the family, second, solid traditional Catholic education. The third might not be guessed, though it is of primary importance: the Mothers of Lu prayer. The prayer and its history follows (from

Somewhere in northern Italy is a rural area containing the town of Lu with about four thousand residents. Families with six to ten children are the rule. 
In 1881, the mothers of the families of Lu began coming together on the First Sunday of each month to assist at Holy Mass and to receive Holy Communion. What the women brought about by these spiritual exercises is expressed very beautifully in the prayer which they recited together at this Mass. 
O God, grant that one of my sons becomes a priest! I promise to live as a good Christian woman and will lead my children to all that is good, wherewith I hope to receive the grace to be able to give to Thee, O God, a holy priest. 
So have the women of Lu prayed all these years since 1881. The prayer was short yet so powerful that a flood of priestly vocations were bestowed upon the town. In fifty years, the prayers of these mothers have won at least five hundred priestly and religious vocations from out of the relatively small village. But, remember, it was only in the town of Lu that for those fifty years, the good women were assisting together at the First Sunday Mass specifically for the intention of religious vocations! 
Happy, blessed Lu! 

This prayer has been said by mothers at Saint Mary's consistently every first Sunday at the altar rail after Holy Mass for more than a decade now. Those who have been there for all these years say that vocations have truly blossomed since its recitation began.

One other key ingredient for the formation of vocations was added by Father Jackson, and that is sacrifice. Certainly this is easily seen within the three aspects mentioned by Dr. Flanery. He and Mrs. Flanery are the parents of 10 children, they made sure their children were educated at traditional Catholic schools in so far as they were available, and they have been dedicated to praying for vocations. 

Whence vocations? Sacrifice. Sacrifice to be open to all the children with which God will bless your family, sacrifice to give them a traditional Catholic education where daily they are taught and formed as Catholics by holy priests, and dedication to prayer for vocations. The fruits are apparent in Father Flanery, but also in his sister, Sister Mary Bernard of the Franciscan Sisters of Christ the King in Kansas City, and a younger brother who this fall will enter the Brothers Novitiate at Saint Thomas Aquinas Seminary in Winona, MN. How very blessed is the dear Flanery family! And how blessed and privileged are we, the faithful, to be able to assist and celebrate with them.

I will conclude by keeping the original title of this post, as it is quite appropriate! But as the other possibilities also would work... on this Father's Day Sunday where we heard Father Flanery's First Holy Mass, received his First Blessing, and attended his Reception, I wish to say, Congratulations, Father Flanery! And a very Happy Father's Day to you, to all of our priestly Fathers, and indeed to all fathers!

O Lord, grant us many holy priests and religious vocations!